Tag Archives: Plantar Fasciitis

I Have Pain In My Heel – How Can I Treat It?

9 Sep

At one time or another during your life, you’re probably going to experience some degree of heel pain – just about everyone does. It might develop from playing basketball, not allowing enough time to rest in between runs, or even from doing nothing at all out of the ordinary. And you can develop heel pain at any age, including adolescence.

my heel hurts

The most common cause of heel pain in adults is Plantar Fasciitis.

The most common cause of heel pain is irritation or damage to the plantar fascia, the tendon that connects your heel to your arch. But heel pain can also be the result of damage or strain to the achilles tendon, which connects your heel to your calf muscle.

In children, heel pain is frequently associated with Sever’s Disease, a bone disorder caused by inflammation of the growth plate in the heel. Heel pain can also be the result of arthritis, bursitis, gout, a pinched nerve, a heel spur, a stress fracture to the heel bone (calcaneus) or other conditions. Because the possibilities are so numerous, it’s essential that you have your heel pain diagnosed by a podiatrist so that a proper course of action can be prescribed to heal your foot as quickly as possible.

The most common causes of heel pain

Plantar Fasciitis is by far the most common reason for heel pain. The classic sign of PF arrives first thing in the morning when you step out of bed – a sharp pain in your heel, which gradually fades as the tendon warms up with movement. But the pain may return if you exercise or stand for long periods. Read more about Plantar Fasciitis.

The Achilles Tendon is responsible for every step you take, and you couldn’t make a jump shot without it. When we demand too much of the achilles tendon, it becomes irritated or ruptured, causing pain that can be felt anywhere along the rear of the ankle, including the heel. Read more about injuries to the achilles tendon.

In children, Sever’s disease, known as calcaneal apophysitis, is the most common cause of heel pain. The inflammation of the heel’s growth plate is quite painful, and should never be ignored. Sever’s Disease is very common in obese children and those who play lots of sports, and most commonly occurs during growth spurts in adolescence.  Read more about heel pain in children.

How you can treat heel pain at home

Like the old saying goes, your best defense is a strong offense, and this is especially true when it comes to protecting your feet from heel pain. Always perform simple exercises to warm up your legs and feet before exercising. When tissues and bones are gently stretched before your game or workout, they’re better able to handle the load you’ll be demanding of them, and the less likely they are to become irritated or ruptured. See simple stretching exercises here. It’s also a good idea to slowly work up to your maximum, and not start out at full speed. And you should always wear a sturdy, supportive pair of athletic shoes to support your feet when exercising.

If you already have a mild case of heel pain, try:

  • Resting. Avoid doing the activity which caused the heel pain.
  • Stretch. Simple, gentle stretching exercises performed in the morning or evening can relax and strengthen the tissues which surround the heel bone.
  • Ice packs applied to your heel for 20 minutes at a time can reduce inflammation and pain.
  • Anti-inflammatory medicine like advil (ibuprofen) or aleve (naproxen) can be used to manage pain and reduce inflammation.
  • Do your shoes fit properly? In some cases, switching to a new pair of athletic shoes with excellent support of the arch and heel reduces symptoms considerably.
  • Download our free guide on treating your heel pain at home.

If you have heel pain that won’t resolve with in-home treatment, make an appointment with your podiatrist for a diagnosis and treatment plan. He or she may choose to treat your heel pain with steroid injections, immobilization, physical therapy, custom in-shoe orthotics, or other non-invasive procedures. If your heel pain is serious and chronic, surgery may be recommended.

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What Your Feet Tell You About Your Health

28 May

foot health

Seems to us that every general physician should ask you to take your socks off. Even if you’ve gone to see your doctor complaining of a chest cold, an inspection of your feet might inform them of the early symptoms of many conditions.

Our feet are farthest from our hearts and spine, so in many cases they’re the first area to indicate problems with the nerves or circulatory disorders. The brain and internal organs receive blood before our toes and feet do, so our appendages are the first to suffer.

Nine health problems which first show up in your feet

1.Always cold feet could be a sign of hypothyroidism, a condition in which your thyroid gland is underperforming. Most common as we approach middle age, hypothyroidism can also cause hair loss, fatigue, weight gain, and depression. A simple blood test ordered by your doctor can confirm this condition, and daily oral medication can get your thyroid gland functioning properly.

2. Suddenly hairless toes and feet could be a sign of a circulatory disorder, as your feet may not be receiving enough blood flow to sustain hair growth. Your doctor should check for a pulse in your feet, and if she has any doubts, should order a thorough cardiovascular screen.

3. Foot cramps that won’t quit may indicate a nutritional deficiency or dehydration. Sure, everybody’s feet cramp up now and then, but what matters is how often and how severe. If you exercise a lot, make sure you drink plenty of water to hydrate your muscles. You also should eat a balanced diet with plenty of potassium, magnesium, and calcium, as a lack of these nutrients can also cause cramping (good sources are nuts, leafy greens, and dairy). To relieve cramps in your feet, stretch your toes up, not down. If the cramping in your feet just won’t let up, see your podiatrist so that he or she can test for circulation issues or nerve damage.

4. Yellowing toenails is a sign of aging, but may also indicate a fungal infection. Yellowing can also occur when you wear nail polish for months without a break. If your toenails are flaky or brittle, you probably have a fungal infection and should see a podiatrist for treatment.

5. Flaky, itchy, or peeling skin between your toes is a sure sign of athlete’s foot. Even if you’re not an athlete, it’s easy to pick up a case of athlete’s foot if your feet are crammed in shoes all day or you walk barefoot in common areas like a sauna or swimming pool. Use an over the counter creme to relieve the symptoms, but if your flaking, itching, or peeling continues, you may have psoriasis or eczema. Your podiatrist can determine which is which and suggest a course of treatment.

6. Your big toe suddenly becomes swollen and painful. This is an almost sure sign that you have gout, a condition that inflames the joint. But it might also indicate inflammatory arthritis or infection. If it’s due to trauma, like someone landing on your foot after a jump shot, well, you’ll probably figure that one out.

7. A sore on your foot that won’t heal is a common side effect of diabetes, skin cancer, or circulatory disorders. In the case of diabetes, blood glucose levels that have raged out of control for long periods lead to nerve damage and small blood vessel damage, which in many cases appears first in your feet.  If the sore gets infected, it can lead to an amputation. But a sore on your foot – even between your toes – can also indicate certain kinds of skin cancer, so be sure to have it checked out by your podiatrist as soon as you discover it.

8. A slowly enlarging “growth” aside your big toe is probably a bunion. Faulty, inherited foot structure leads to this common foot deformity, which can be exacerbated by poor choices in footwear like high heels and flip flops. Unfortunately, bunions rarely stop growing, so that small, slightly sore bump today may be quite large and painful years from now. The only sure way to correct a bunion is with surgery. Splints, toe separators, and the like are temporary measures which will relieve symptoms, but won’t stop the deformity from becoming worse.

9. Pain in your heel may indicate plantar fasciitis, an inflammation of the tissue which connects your heel to your arch. If you have a sharp pain in your heel when you get out of bed in the morning, which slowly subsides as you move around, you probably have PF. There are many causes of plantar fasciitis, but primarily poor footwear, obesity, or working out too aggressively are to blame. To relieve minor symptoms of plantar fasciitis, ease up on your exercise program, lose weight, or wear shoes which support your feet properly. If symptoms persist, see your podiatrist for treatment.

Landscaping: How To Protect Your Feet From Injuries

15 May

Which would you rather say to your podiatrist?

“I got this monumental ankle sprain when I was pushing my lawnmower and rolled my foot in a gopher hole.”
or
“I got this monumental ankle sprain when I rolled my foot AFTER THE MOST SPECTACULAR JUMP SHOT EVER!

If you picked “gopher hole”, you’re in the minority.

Landscaping – and even gardening – cause their share of foot and ankle injuries, especially in spring when we’re out of shape. We tend to jump right in where we left off in October, and our bodies just aren’t up to it. Bending, twisting, and lifting or pushing heavy and sharp equipment can cause an injury quite quickly if you don’t take a few precautions.

chainsaw

We hope he’s wearing a good pair of work boots

Wear proper footwear.

It may have been fine when you were a teenager to wear worn-out sneakers when you cut the lawn. As an adult, you should wear athletic shoes which support your feet well and will protect them if you step on a rock you didn’t expect to be there. Or in the groundhog hole which magically appeared overnight.

If your ankles or feet have been subject to injuries in the past, or if you’re landscaping with sharp equipment, wear a quality pair of work boots (not garden boots, which offer little protection beyond moisture). If you’re a landscaper, work boots with good support and metal-tipped toes should always be on your feet. Work boots will also protect your feet in the event you accidentally drop any equipment with sharp blades or heavy bottoms (like a tamper).

Don’t work on a wet lawn.

When grass is even a little wet, it can be very slippery. If you have a slope or hill on your lawn, cutting it when wet can be especially dangerous. Wait to mow your lawn until the turf is completely dry.

Use equipment with safety shutoffs.

Decades ago, equipment with sharp blades only stopped turning when you intentionally shut it off, which allowed chainsaws to run out of control, and feet to slide under lawnmowers while the blades were still turning. Fortunately, most modern lawnmowers, edgers, tillers, cultivators, post hole diggers, chain saws, and other equipment with high speed, rotating blades or teeth, stop as soon as you let go of the handle or trigger. If you’re still using decades-old equipment which doesn’t have a shutoff feature, it’s time to upgrade.

Shovels and other step-on equipment can cause surprising damage to your feet.

If you’re doing a project that requires a lot of digging, or using equipment like manual aerators for your lawn, wear quality work boots at all times. The repeated stepping-on-with-force required with these tools can cause injuries like sesamoiditis, plantar fasciitis, sprains and fractures.

If you have ankle, foot, leg, or back issues, stretch before you start.

In gardening and landscaping, lots of bending, squatting, twisting and turning is required, sometimes while holding or moving heavy equipment. Injuries happen remarkably quickly when your body isn’t prepared for them. We recommend that those who have previous injuries of the back, hip, legs, feet, or ankles, or are over 50, stretch before they begin their activities.

Taking these precautions and wearing work boots when you garden or landscape may not make you look like the coolest guy or girl on the block, but they’ll keep you out of the podiatrist’s office. Or the ER.

 

Why You Should Skip the Flip-Flops This Summer

7 May
Flip-flops are just so easy – slip ’em on and run out the door. Seems like everybody starts wearing them as soon as outdoor temps climb above 50 degrees.

flip-flops-bad-for-your-feet

Unfortunately, flip-flops are just about the worst thing you can wear on your feet. In fact, there is a growing problem of heel pain among teens and young adults, which podiatrists are attributing to wearing this paper-thin footwear (no doubt intensified by the obesity epidemic).

Walking barefoot is better for your feet than walking in flip-flops. If your feet have any abnormal biomechanics, flip-flops can accentuate these problems, leading to plantar fasciitis and accelerating other foot problems.

Think about it: the bones in your feet are the base of your skeleton and your body weight is riding on them. If your feet aren’t supported correctly, the rest of your bones, joint, tendons, and muscles have to make up for it. The stress shifts elsewhere and that leads to foot pain, heel pain, leg pain, hip pain, bad knees, sore back, and any number of other ailments.

Naturally, wearing flip-flops in the sauna, locker room, or by the pool won’t cause any harm. But as everyday footwear, we suggest you make a smarter choice.

So how exactly do flip-flops affect your feet?

Toes: That little thong that slips between your toes actually makes the muscles in your feet work overtime. The perpetual gripping this requires of your feet can lead to a nasty case of tendinitis, hammertoes, and bunions. Additionally, bare skin rubbing against the plastic or leather thong can lead to nasty blisters.

Fractures: With no support under your feet, all of that pressure from your body weight can create stress fractures in the bones of your feet. If you spend a lot of time on your feet in flip-flops, this is very likely to occur.

Bottom of your feet: The flip-flop isn’t stationary on your foot like an athletic shoe is. Since the bottom of your foot is in a constant sliding motion against the material, it can create a burning feeling or blisters, especially on hot days.

Arch and heel pain: If your footwear doesn’t support your arch, you run an excellent chance of developing plantar fasciitis, the inflammation of the band of tissue which runs along the bottom of your foot, connecting your heel to your arch. Pain may be felt anywhere along the plantar fascia.

For summer footwear, we suggest that you always wear athletic shoes that fit properly or a solid, rugged pair of sandals with significant arch support and a heavy sole.

Thanks to Huffington Post for this excellent infographic on what happens to your feet when you wear flip-flops.

flip flops

Mark Trumbo’s Foot Injury: Why playing through pain is always a bad idea

25 Apr
From any podiatrist’s point of view, it was just a matter of time. Mark Trumbo of the Arizona Diamondbacks developed plantar fasciitis in spring training. Ignoring the pain, he continued to play. This week, Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson announced that Trumbo is on the 15 day DL with a stress fracture in his left foot – the same foot which developed the plantar fasciitis.

trumbo foot injury

In hindsight, Trumbo’s stats suggest that the pain from his plantar fasciitis was affecting his play. From Bleacher Report: Trumbo got off to a red-hot start for Arizona with five home runs in his first nine games of the new season. His play has dropped off considerably after that early surge, however. His on-base percentage has dipped to .264 and he’s only chipped in two more homers since April 6. 

Trumbo said,  “The plantar (fasciitis) at times has been pretty bad but manageable. That’s what you have to do. You’ve got to earn a living and play. This was to the point where I severely had to compensate running-wise to the point where I probably wouldn’t be much of an asset on either side.”

We disagree that Trumbo had to play through the pain. But we do agree that most likely, the compensation resulted in the stress fracture. If Trumbo and his trainers would have addressed the plantar fasciitis at its onset, he would have had to sit out 3-4 weeks while he rehabbed (depending on its severity), but he could have avoided the more severe stress fracture injury. Bleacher Report also notes that: “…the slugger had a similar issue in the opposite foot three years ago and it took more than five months to recover. Although this injury isn’t as serious, there’s no timetable for his return to the Diamondbacks lineup.” 

As we always say, NO pain is normal.

Plantar fasciitis is no joke. In its early stages, some might consider it a minor injury, but PF can quickly turn into an extremely painful, almost crippling condition. Taking that first step after getting out of bed can send shooting pain through your heel. While the pain tends to diminish as the tendon warms up, professional athletes, who place a great amount of stress on their feet, must address their plantar fasciitis early. If they continue to play, the PF will become much worse, or due to compensation, a more severe injury develops – like a stress fracture.

When you feel pain in your foot, it’s an indication that something is wrong. Address the symptoms early, and the sports injury experts at PA Foot and Ankle Associates will develop a plan to get you back in the game with minimum bench time.

 

Basketball: How to avoid the most common foot and ankle injuries

5 Mar

It’s safe to say that no sport demands more from an athlete’s feet and ankles than Basketball. Every movement on the court starts with the player’s feet – every shot, every rebound, and every pass.

The sudden turns, side-to-side cutting, running, stopping, sudden acceleration, changes in direction, jumping, and landing, combined with the immense size of pro basketball players, creates an almost perfect storm of injury possibilities for the lower extremities. Professional athletes train constantly on and off-court, in-season and out of season, yet their bones still fracture and their tendons and ligaments tear.

Here are the most common basketball injuries to the foot and ankle:
deron williams ankle sprain

Deron Williams of the Nets suffered an ankle sprain in 2013

Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain occurs when the foot rolls inward or outward and stretches or tears the ligaments in the ankle. In basketball, this usually occurs when the player lands improperly after a layup, or steps or lands on another player’s foot. Swelling and bruising occur, and the foot can’t bear weight. Mild ankle sprains heal relatively quickly, but a severe sprain can disable a player for 8 weeks or more.

Watch a video of Dr. Teichman from PA Foot and Ankle Associates explaining how an ankle sprain occurs.

Fractures

Fractures of the metatarsals (the long bones in your feet), the tibia (shinbone), and the navicular bone (on the top of your foot near the ankle), are what podiatrists refer to as overuse injuries. As an athlete trains, bones actually develop tiny fractures which heal quickly and strengthen the bone. However, their adjustment is slow, and when outside stress exceeds the bone’s capability to withstand it, the bone fractures. The repeated pounding of running, jumping, and landing is especially difficult on the 5th metatrasal bone on the outside of the foot, and is the bone most often fractured by basketball players.

Read more about foot fractures

Plantar fasciitis

Another overuse injury, plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of the plantar fascia, the band of tissue which connects the arch of the foot to the heel. Repeated pounding on hard surfaces – the basketball court – subjects the plantar fascia to stress, and it reacts with inflammation and pain. Treatment and rest are essential at the first sign of pain from plantar fasciitis, because if an athlete continues to play on the sore foot, the condition will only worsen.

Read more about plantar fasciitis

Achilles Tendonitis

Your achilles tendon is responsible for every step you take, and you couldn’t make that jump shot if you didn’t have one. You’re asking a lot of this tendon during the game and sometimes it can’t keep up, and becomes strained and irritated (itis).

The achilles tendon attaches your calf muscle to your heel, and when you damage it, you’ll usually feel a knife-like pain in your leg, just below the calf muscle. It maybe accompanied by swelling. If you really do a job on it and cause it to rupture, you may be able to walk, but it will be impossible to jump until it’s healed. An evaluation from a podiatrist is absolutely essential to speed its healing.

Read more about achilles tendonitis ​

For any of these injuries, the sooner that RICE begins, the less secondary damage you’ll incur. (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation). Do not continue to play or the injury may become much worse. Have your injury examined by a podiatrist as soon as possible.

How to avoid basketball injuries

Proper athletic conditioning

Strong and flexible ankles reduce the occurrence of injuries, improve performance on court, and decrease the time lost to an injury. Weekend athletes in pick-up basketball games are most frequently injured due to their lack of conditioning and weight training. That Michael Jordan-style layup looks beautiful, but hurts like mad coming down, especially if you land on another player’s foot.

Cold muscles are more prone to injury, so stretch and warm up before games with a light run, walking, biking, or calisthenics like jumping jacks and basic stretches. Stretch your muscles after the game also. If you’re out of shape, ease into it and don’t try to play like you did when you weighed 25 pounds less.

Wear new basketball shoes

They’re called basketball shoes for a good reason – they’re designed to support and accommodate the foot for the unique stresses of the game. If you play every weekend, your shoes should be updated every two months, as the padding and support wears out quickly. If you’re in high school or college, and working out almost every day, you should replace your shoes every month during the season.

The padding and stability a good pair of basketball shoes offer is your best defense against injury. Once your foot begins to rock or slide, even a little inside your shoes, your chance of injury goes up exponentially. As you accumulate playing hours on the shoe, the synthetic uppers slowly begin to fatigue and stretch in response to your starting and stopping motion. Slowly, the foot gains more and more rotational movement within the shoe, which in turn offers less and less protection to the foot.

Wear custom orthotics if you had a previous injury

Hands down, the best way to avoid re-injuring your foot or to provide additional arch support is to have custom orthotics made by a podiatrist. Proper balance, support, and foot/leg alignment are not only necessary for you to consistently play at your best level, but for your protection as well. In fact, the use of custom orthotics in the NBA has increased from about 40% in 1990 to more than 80% today.

Psoriatic Arthritis In The Feet and Ankles: Symptoms and Treatment

25 Feb

Psoriatic arthritis, sometimes misdiagnosed as osteoarthritis, gout, or rheumatoid arthritis, is a form of arthritis accompanied by psoriasis, a condition which causes scaly red and white patches on your skin. This form of arthritis can cause swelling in your toes, frequently described as making them look like sausages.

Psoriatic arthritis feet and toes

Psoriatic arthritis causes toes to swell like sausages, a condition called dactylitis. In this patient, the toenails have been affected by the psoriasis, which is often misdiagnosed as a fungal infection.

Psoriasis is a condition in which the body’s immune system goes into overdrive and attacks healthy tissue in the skin, creating an overproduction of skin cells. In psoriatic arthritis, the immune system also attacks your joints, causing persistent, painful inflammation, in addition to the skin condition. It typically affects the larger joints in your feet or ankles, but may affect the smallest joints in the toes as well. Swelling of the joints in the toes can be quite extreme, taking on the appearance of sausages, a condition called dactylitis.

Psoriatic arthritis can also cause discoloration and “pitting” in your toenails – depressions or separation from the nail bed. As these symptoms appear similar to a fungal infection, it’s often misdiagnosed. In later stages, toenails may crumble or suffer other damage.

Why the immune system turns on healthy tissue is still somewhat of a mystery, but it appears that genetic and environmental factors are at play. Many patients who suffer with psoriatic arthritis have a family history of the disease, or a family history of psoriasis. In others, physical trauma, or a viral or bacterial infection may trigger psoriatic arthritis.

One of the characteristics of psoriatic arthritis is Enthesitis – pain in the heel or the sole, where ligaments and tendons join the bone. In some cases, this is the cause of plantar fasciitis or Achilles tendinitis. Research suggests that the continual inflammation from psoriatic arthritis causes significant joint damage, so early diagnosis and treatment is important.

If you’re experiencing heel pain, arch pain, or joint pain in your ankles or feet, and you suffer from psoriasis, please inform your podiatrist, as your treatment plan may vary.

Just as with rheumatoid arthritis, the pain and stiffness in joints affected by psoriatic arthritis is progressive, which means it will worsen over time. The pain and stiffness may at times subside and vary in intensity. Additionally, some patients also experience mood changes, fatigue, muscle weakness, and anemia.

Osteoarthritis may accompany psoriatic arthritis, and bones in the feet, ankle, or toes may deteriorate. Your podiatrist can use ultrasound imaging to determine this even before other symptoms occur.

Unfortunately, psoriatic arthritis becomes extremely painful as the condition progresses. Toes and feet may become swollen and tender, and they may no longer fit into your shoes. Your podiatrist may recommend special footwear in this case.

Symptoms of psoriatic arthritis in the foot and ankle

  • Joint pain. Joints may also be swollen or warm to the touch
  • Joints in the toes may develop dactylitis, a unique type of swelling. Dactylitis sometimes develops before pain or stiffness occurs.
  • Toes may become deformed and nails become discolored or pitted
  • Achilles tendinitis or plantar fasciitis may develop
  • Unlike other forms of arthritis, psoriatic arthritis is more likely to cause pain in the tendons of your feet

Who is most likely to develop psoriatic arthritis?

  • People with a family history of the disease. Men and women are equally affected.
  • People with psoriasis, especially those who have psoriasis lesions on their toenails
  • Those between the ages of 30-50, but it may also occur in children

Treatment for psoriatic arthritis

  • Mild exercise like walking, biking, or swimming keeps joints flexible and reduces pain
  • Stretching exercises
  • Custom orthotics (shoe inserts) to relieve pressure on painful areas
  • Wear comfortable footwear like athletic shoes,or if severe, diabetic shoes
  • Over the counter anti-inflammatory pain relievers like ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil), or naproxen (Aleve)
  • Cortocisteroid injections from your podiatrist to reduce joint swelling
  • Prescription medicines used to treat Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Podiatric surgery to replace or repair damaged joints

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

4 Dec
plantar fasciitis

Kobe Bryant famously suffered with Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar Fasciitis is the leading cause of heel pain. In medicine, the suffix itis refers to irritation or inflammation of an organ, and in this case, to the plantar fascia, a band of tissue which connects your heel bone (calcaneus) to the ball of your foot. Pain can be felt anywhere along this path.

The classic sign of plantar fasciitis comes in the morning, when you step out of bed – a sharp pain in your heel. Gradually, as the tissue warms up and becomes flexible, the pain fades – maybe not completely, but substantially. It may then return if you stand on your feet all day or exercise, especially if you run or exercise strenuously.

What causes the heel pain of plantar fasciitis? When the plantar fascia is constantly stressed, small tears occur in the tissue. The tears make the plantar fascia weaker, less able to do its job of support and shock absorption. This offloading of the work causes stress on the surrounding tissues, which is the actual cause of the pain.

Plantar fasciitis also makes itself known to those who are carrying more body weight than normal, like pregnant women or obese individuals. You might also develop plantar fasciitis if you made a poor choice in shoes and wear a style which doesn’t support your feet correctly. People with flat feet also frequently suffer from plantar fasciitis, as do long distance runners .

Symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis
  • A sharp pain at the back of your heel, sometimes described as “knife-like”
  • Pain is most common with your first few steps in the morning, but may also occur after physical activity, or climbing stairs
  • In most cases, pain increases gradually
  • Usually appears in one foot, but occasionally both
  • Foot may be stiff and difficult to bend
heel pain plantar fasciitis

Click for larger view

The Plantar Fascia acts like a shock absorber for your foot, and also supports your arch. If the plantar fascia receives repetitive stress, such as from exercising on hard surfaces, unsupportive footwear, or too much pressure from weight, small tears form in the tissue. These tears cause irritation in the surrounding tissue, which triggers pain.

If plantar fasciitis is left untreated, the condition may get substantially worse. Knee pain is also frequently reported in patients with plantar fasciitis, due to their change in gait to compensate for the heel pain.

Treatment for Plantar Fasciitis
  • Custom orthotics (not off the shelf) prescribed by your podiatrist
  • Physical therapy
  • Rest, elevate, and ice the heel
  • Over the counter anti inflammatory pain medicine such as Ibuprofen (Advil) or Naproxen (Aleve)
  • Athletic shoes which provide excellent arch support and padding at the heel
  • If exercising, train on soft surfaces instead of hard surfaces
  • If overweight, start a weight management program

If these methods aren’t successful in relieving your pain, your podiatrist may recommend steroid injections, PRP injections, EPAT (shockwave) therapy, Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA), or in extreme cases, surgery.

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