Giants’ Jon Beason Sidelined With Sesamoid Injury

16 Jun

Here’s some potentially bad news for Giants fans: Middle linebacker Jon Beason injured his right foot during off season training Friday. It appears he suffered a ligament tear and a fracture of the sesamoid bone.

jon beason foot injury

Beason at work against the Redskins in 2013

“You have freak injuries,” Beason said. “I was just changing directions… the movement was a little unorthodox, I was flexing with the big toe in the ground and then I pivoted on it all the way around. It’s a movement that I often do… I literally felt like I stepped in like a sprinkler head hole. I just felt it give right away.

“I really felt that I that I had torn the extensor, which is the tendon with the muscle, it’s how your big toe functions. That would have been season-ending.”

After limping to the sidelines and huddling with the training staff, Beason was carted off the field and taken to the Hospital for Special Surgery where he underwent an array of tests: MRI, CT, and x-rays. A definitive treatment plan has yet to be announced, but Beason’s status for the Giants’ regular season opener in Detroit is up in the air, as an injury like his typically requires a 12 week recovery period.

Beason, a 3-time Pro Bowler, was drafted by the Carolina Panthers in 2007. He played only one game for the Panthers in the 2011 season when he ruptured his left achilles tendon, and in 2012, played in just four games before suffering a microfracture in his right knee, requiring surgery.

Beason was traded to the Giants in October of 2013, and played in all 12 remaining games. At the end of the season, he was second on the team with 93 tackles. The Giants re-signed him in March and expected him to be a cornerstone of their defense this year.

So what’s a sesamoid anyway?

Most bones in our bodies are connected at joints, but not the sesamoids, which are connected only to tendons or embedded in muscle. Your kneecap is the largest sesamoid in your body, and the smallest are those found in the foot, two tiny, pea-shaped bones in the front of each foot that most people are unfamiliar with until they’re injured.

Located just behind the big toe, the sesamoids act like pulleys, providing a smooth surface over which the tendons glide, increasing the leverage of the tendons controlling the big toe. The sesamoids also assist with weightbearing and elevate the bones in your biggest toe. But that’s assuming you have sesamoids – some people are born without sesamoids in their feet and experience no problems.

Read more about sesamoiditis

If you damage the sesamoid bones in your feet, you’ll feel the pain in the ball of your foot, just behind the joint of the big toe. You may simply have an irritation of the tendons around the bones – called sesamoiditis, or you may have actually broken one of the tiny bones.

If you suspect an unjury to the sesamoids, seek an evaluation from a podiatrist, the most knowledgeable physician to treat this uncommon injury. Before your appointment, stop the activity which caused the pain, take over the counter pain medicine like advil or aleve to manage the pain and soreness, and use ice to reduce swelling.

If after a diagnosis, your podiatrist confirms an injury to the sesamoid bones, she or he may recommend any of the following:

  • custom orthotics to shift your body weight off of the forefoot
  • steroid injections to relieve swelling and pain
  • immobilization with a surgical boot
  • physical therapy
  • strapping or taping the big toe
  • surgery to remove or repair the sesamoids

The podiatrists at PA Foot and Ankle Associates are experts at treating sports injuries and are the best qualified physicians to diagnose and treat uncommon injuries of the foot and ankle.

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