Red Sox’ Mike Carp on DL with Broken Foot

5 Jun

We’re always happy to see an athlete and clubhouse taking their foot and ankle injuries seriously and giving them time to heal.

red sox mike carp

The world champion Boston Red Sox announced that 1st baseman and outfielder Mike Carp is on the 15 day DL with a fractured right foot. Last week, Carp was struck by a pitch during a game against Atlanta when he fouled it off his foot. He continued to play (risky!) and post-game x-rays were negative. So he also started Friday’s and Saturday’s games.

But after Sunday’s game against Tampa Bay, Carp’s foot was still hurting, so he had further tests done. No surprise to us that a CT scan revealed a fracture. After all, the pitch from the Braves’ David Hale was flying at 83 mph BEFORE Carp fouled it off his right foot. After the scan, doctors immediately ordered Carp into a walking boot and he’ll be on the bench for 2-3 weeks, according to Red Sox manager John Farell.

It’s necessary to rest a fractured bone in the foot for at least a week. After that, a strict regimen of physical therapy is required for an athlete to get the bone back in shape. If Carp resumes playing before the bone is properly healed, the fracture can become much worse. Or due to weakness in the bone, the foot may be injured in another way, such as an ankle sprain, tendon rupture, or fracture elsewhere in the foot.

The Red Sox and every baseball club – or for that matter any sport organization – should move cautiously when allowing a team member to resume playing. What’s best for the team isn’t always what’s best for the player (see: concussion lawsuit/NFL).

If you’re an athlete and experience any tenderness or pain in your feet, ankles, or lower legs, it’s always best to have it checked by a podiatrist at PA Foot and Ankle Associates, even if your trainer has given you the green light. Podiatrists and podiatric surgeons are the only physicians trained exclusively to treat the diseases and conditions of the foot and ankle and are expert in diagnosing and treating minor injuries before they become big problems.

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