Mark Trumbo’s Foot Injury: Why playing through pain is always a bad idea

25 Apr
From any podiatrist’s point of view, it was just a matter of time. Mark Trumbo of the Arizona Diamondbacks developed plantar fasciitis in spring training. Ignoring the pain, he continued to play. This week, Diamondbacks manager Kirk Gibson announced that Trumbo is on the 15 day DL with a stress fracture in his left foot – the same foot which developed the plantar fasciitis.

trumbo foot injury

In hindsight, Trumbo’s stats suggest that the pain from his plantar fasciitis was affecting his play. From Bleacher Report: Trumbo got off to a red-hot start for Arizona with five home runs in his first nine games of the new season. His play has dropped off considerably after that early surge, however. His on-base percentage has dipped to .264 and he’s only chipped in two more homers since April 6. 

Trumbo said,  “The plantar (fasciitis) at times has been pretty bad but manageable. That’s what you have to do. You’ve got to earn a living and play. This was to the point where I severely had to compensate running-wise to the point where I probably wouldn’t be much of an asset on either side.”

We disagree that Trumbo had to play through the pain. But we do agree that most likely, the compensation resulted in the stress fracture. If Trumbo and his trainers would have addressed the plantar fasciitis at its onset, he would have had to sit out 3-4 weeks while he rehabbed (depending on its severity), but he could have avoided the more severe stress fracture injury. Bleacher Report also notes that: “…the slugger had a similar issue in the opposite foot three years ago and it took more than five months to recover. Although this injury isn’t as serious, there’s no timetable for his return to the Diamondbacks lineup.” 

As we always say, NO pain is normal.

Plantar fasciitis is no joke. In its early stages, some might consider it a minor injury, but PF can quickly turn into an extremely painful, almost crippling condition. Taking that first step after getting out of bed can send shooting pain through your heel. While the pain tends to diminish as the tendon warms up, professional athletes, who place a great amount of stress on their feet, must address their plantar fasciitis early. If they continue to play, the PF will become much worse, or due to compensation, a more severe injury develops – like a stress fracture.

When you feel pain in your foot, it’s an indication that something is wrong. Address the symptoms early, and the sports injury experts at PA Foot and Ankle Associates will develop a plan to get you back in the game with minimum bench time.

 

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